7 Ways to Improve Your Cold Emails
Cold emails can be a daunting task for anyone who is not naturally good at sales, but it can make or break a person's job.

There's nothing worse than sending out a sales email and the prospects just delete it without even reading it. This is a lot more likely to happen than you may think.

In fact, according to a recent study, the average person spends only 2.7 seconds on a cold email they are not expecting. That's it.


What is cold emailing anyway?

Cold emailing on the internet is exactly like it sounds. It is an email that is unsolicited and sent out cold, to a potential prospect or decision-maker on an internet-based business.

In order to write a good cold email or any form of email for that matter, there are a couple of guidelines that should be followed.

1. Provide a compelling headline

Often times, cold emails are thrown away without even opening, but with a compelling headline, it can catch someone's attention. This could be a bold statement about what your company offers or a question that your target audience would be interested in.

2. The first line.

The first line is equally if not more important than the headline for capturing the attention of prospects. Consider how boring the first line is if it is just a way of introducing yourself.

Beyond introductions, the first line should be a question, a statement, or an interesting story.

3. Give details right away.

The first paragraph is what will catch the reader's attention the most. Be kind to your reader and have your most compelling evidence upfront.

4. Stay on topic.

A cold email is only about one topic. All content in the email should be relevant to the topic.

5. Be concise.

Brevity is the "soul of wit" and it should be considered in cold emails as well. Keep your email to one page, with one logical flow.

6. Write your email as if the reader wrote it to you.

Essentially, you want to address your email in the 2nd person.

7. Call to action.

In the end, there should be a clear call to action.

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